As Soon as a Coin In the Coffer Rings, a Soul From Purgatory Springs

As the Daily Record reports on the peddling of Papal merchandise which would make Father Dougall blanch, the Herald covers the ‘persuasion’ being brought to bear on the Catholic… oh, okay, I was raised an Episcopalian… the Roman Catholic faithful to pay for access to Ballahouston Park.

Parishioners have been told there is an expectation they should make a donation of £20 each to cover transport and the cost of a pilgrim pack with a CD and an information booklet.

Anyone attending the papal visit to Bellahouston Park on September 16, including children, will require a pilgrim pass contained in the pack.

The Catholic Church insists the £20-per-head cost is not an individual levy but a parish fee. Anyone unable to pay would not have to.

However, priests have warned that cash-strapped parishes may be forced to return tickets if they are unable to meet the cost of subsidising families who cannot afford to pay. One Glasgow parish has been allocated more than 542 tickets and is expected to find more than £10,000. 

What would Johann Tetzel say?

Advertisements

Tags: ,

2 Responses to “As Soon as a Coin In the Coffer Rings, a Soul From Purgatory Springs”

  1. Richard T Says:

    Isn’t this ‘fund raising’ on the same lines as the sale of indulgences which caused Luther to start the Reformation? Presumably if you subscribe there’ll be a few thousand years knocked off your spell in Purgatory.

  2. Dominic Says:

    Well, Luther was hardly the first churchman to try to combat simony – and those that preceded him generally had less destructive and negative consequences.

    And, in any case, no, it’s not remotely the same (which is not to say that I think there is very much that is commendable about the way that the Bishops of England and Wales have organized their part of the papal visit: I refrain from comment on the Scottish side): going to see the pope (above all at the dreadful Hyde Park “liturgical entertainment” thing), while no doubt a virtuous and admirable thing, is not of sacramental character, so has nothing to do with remission of sins in purgatory.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: